Are skin cancer rates higher in Florida?

What states have the lowest skin cancer rates?

Based on the Vitals’ rankings, the states with the lowest risk of skin cancer are:

  • Louisiana.
  • Texas.
  • Hawaii.
  • Rhode Island.
  • North Carolina.

Where is skin cancer most common?

8 Most Common Places to Get Skin Cancer

  • Face. It shouldn’t be a surprise that your face is the most common place for skin cancer to develop. …
  • Scalp. Most skin cancers on the scalp occur in balding men. …
  • Ears. …
  • Neck. …
  • Hands. …
  • Chest and Back. …
  • Legs. …
  • Palms of Hand, Soles of Feet, and Nail Beds.

What race is most likely to get skin cancer?

Skin cancer is the most common malignancy in the United States and represents ~ 35–45% of all neoplasms in Caucasians (Ridky, 2007), 4–5% in Hispanics, 2–4% in Asians, and 1–2% in Blacks (Halder and Bridgeman-Shah, 1995; Gloster and Neal, 2006).

What state has the highest melanoma rate?

States where men and women are most affected by melanoma

Rank State Deaths
1 Utah 3,057
2 Vermont 873
3 Delaware 1,045
4 New Hampshire 1,520

Do people in Florida get skin cancer?

Florida has the second highest incidence of melanoma in the United States, with an estimated 5260 new cases in 2011. More than 600 Floridians die of melanoma every year; since 1975, the number of deaths among residents older than age 50 has almost doubled.

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Who is more prone to skin cancer?

Skin cancer is more common in fair skinned people because they have less of the protective pigment called melanin. People with darker skin are less likely to get skin cancer. But they can still get skin cancer. Darker skinned people are particularly at risk of skin cancer where the body has less direct sun exposure.

Where does skin cancer usually start?

Where do skin cancers start? Most skin cancers start in the top layer of skin, called the epidermis. There are 3 main types of cells in this layer: Squamous cells: These are flat cells in the upper (outer) part of the epidermis, which are constantly shed as new ones form.