Does rosacea spread acne?

Does rosacea spread on your face?

Rosacea, sometimes called acne rosacea, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin. Those affected tend to blush, or flush, more easily than others. Rosacea can be mild or severe. Over time, the redness can spread from the cheeks and nose to the chin and forehead.

What causes rosacea to spread?

Anything that causes your rosacea to flare is called a trigger. Sunlight and hairspray are common rosacea triggers. Other common triggers include heat, stress, alcohol, and spicy foods. Triggers differ from person to person.

Does rosacea worsen?

Rosacea has flare-ups that come and go. This may happen every few weeks or every few months. If not treated, it tends to get worse over time. It may also be made worse by heat, spicy foods, alcohol, and other triggers.

What should you not do with rosacea?

To reduce the likelihood of a buying a product that will irritate your skin, you want to avoid anything that contains:

  • Alcohol.
  • Camphor.
  • Fragrance.
  • Glycolic acid.
  • Lactic acid.
  • Menthol.
  • Sodium laurel sulfate (often found in shampoos and toothpaste)
  • Urea.

What should I wash my face with if I have rosacea?

Avoid bar soaps (especially deodorant soaps) which can strip your skin of its natural oils. Instead, choose a liquid or creamy cleanser such as Cetaphil Gentle Skin Cleanser, Purpose Gentle Cleansing Wash, or Clinique Comforting Cream Cleanser.

THIS IS IMPORTANT:  Frequent question: Can moles be surgically removed?

Do I need to see a dermatologist for rosacea?

You should see your doctor if: You have just developed symptoms, such as facial redness. Rosacea can look like some other diseases, so it’s important to get a diagnosis. You have developed bumps, pimples, or visible blood vessels — small red, purple, or blue lines — on your face.

What do dermatologists prescribe for rosacea?

Because there is no cure for rosacea, treatment with prescription medication is often required for months to years to control symptoms. In addition, dermatologists commonly prescribe topical creams, lotions, ointments, gels, foams, or pads, such as: Azelaic acid (Azelex and Finacea) Brimonidine(Mirvaso)