Question: Why do I get moles on my back?

What causes moles on your back?

What Causes a Mole? Moles occur when cells in the skin grow in a cluster instead of being spread throughout the skin. These cells are called melanocytes, and they make the pigment that gives skin its natural color. Moles may darken after exposure to the sun, during the teen years, and during pregnancy.

Is it normal to have a lot of moles on your back?

Although common moles are pretty normal and shouldn’t always be a cause for concern, having more than 50 common moles on your body puts you at a drastically increased risk of skin cancer. If you have a lot of moles on your body, regardless of the type of moles that they are, you should consult your physician.

When should I worry about a mole on my back?

If you have any moles that are larger than most, have smudgy or irregular edges, are uneven in colour or have some pinkness, you should see a doctor and get them checked. Any moles that appear newly in adulthood should be checked. The most concerning sign, however, is a changing mole.

Do moles ever go away?

They can change and evolve over time. Some moles eventually fall off altogether. When healthy moles disappear, the process is typically gradual. A disappearing mole may begin as a flat spot, gradually become raised, then get light, pale, and eventually disappear.

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Why am I getting so many moles as I get older?

You can also develop moles during childhood and early adulthood. Sun exposure and other drivers behind aging skin can lead to nevi as an older adult. Some moles can become cancerous, but the majority are harmless — this is why it’s important to always get a dermatologist’s take on any moles in question.

Are skin moles good or bad?

Most moles are harmless. Rarely, they become cancerous. Monitoring moles and other pigmented patches is an important step in detecting skin cancer, especially malignant melanoma. The medical term for moles is nevi.

Why do some people have more moles?

Heredity contributes to the development of dysplastic nevi and to having a higher-than-average number of benign moles. Spending a lot of time in the sun can also increase the number of moles a person has.

What does Stage 1 melanoma look like?

Stage I melanoma is no more than 1.0 millimeter thick (about the size of a sharpened pencil point), with or without an ulceration (broken skin). There is no evidence that Stage I melanoma has spread to the lymph tissues, lymph nodes, or body organs.

Do you get more moles as you get older?

Some People Are More Prone to Moles than Others

You tend to acquire more as you get older. New moles after the age of 25 are somewhat concerning. If you get a lot of new dark, changing moles they may be cancerous so be attentive to new moles and make an appointment with your provider if you think it may be cancer.

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